"OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Friendly, spirited debates please people! Keep it clean.

Do you think this is a good idea?

Yes.
9
30%
No.
17
57%
Don't care/mind.
4
13%
 
Total votes: 30

User avatar
Kitsy
Fufububbles
Fufububbles
Posts: 6887
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 7:57 pm
Real First Name: Katarina
Location: The land of Kitty (: aka. London
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Kitsy » Wed Mar 30, 2011 5:32 pm

Arty, you're a dick. Stop being so elitist, just because you can't seem to comprehend the language that "young people" use today. Just because something is unorthodox, doesn't make it bad or stupid. And how is every day English "intellectual English"? There is no link between intelligence and slang - people at university use slang all the time, people who are studying at Oxbridge use slang. You're equating slang with stupid and, to be blunt, working class people. And do you want to know why you're doing this? Because you're an idiot, and you should fine another forum to terrorise.
Image
Silly little foul black twisted heart I am!
http://superkits.tumblr.com

User avatar
opalkoboi
Heiki Koboi
Posts: 1037
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 7:46 pm
Real First Name: Phoebe
AFC Fan Fiction Name: Heiki Koboi
Location: Forming the Ranga Revolution....MUHAHAHAHA!!!
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby opalkoboi » Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:07 pm

sharkie wrote:
Arty1995 wrote:Us english elitist (The majority of english-speaking people) will use intellectual english (Every day english) while you people can use your unorthadox and incoherent colloqiual english. Deep down inside we all know our english is more subtle.



That's a load of rubbish that the majority of english speaking people use your english. What you consider everyday english is NOT everyday english. Everyday english varies from place to place- everyday english in Newcastle is different from everyday english in New York which is different from every day english in Glasgow which is different from everyday english in Sydney.

English is a language spoken all over the world and has many different form, there is no such thing as a defined every day english- or correct English.


I like the point you made Sharkie, and just to add in my own weird way:
There is no "intelligent english" or "everyday english" - if anything, lol is everyday english for young people.
Secondly, everywhere in the world uses colloqiualisms. In Australlia, for example, they say Ranga instead of Ginger. Does that make it wrong? No! It's just a variation of the English language! If you notice, too, Arty 100% of the votes say it's a bad idea - so pay attention.
There is, however, standard english. English that is taught and used by the majority of english speakers. Besides, as long as we can understand each other, why does it matter?


I know, I hate the fact lol is replacing laughter! People say "lol" to a joke, and I'm just like, "Well why don't you?" XD
Image
I see you too! XD

Image

User avatar
opalkoboi
Heiki Koboi
Posts: 1037
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 7:46 pm
Real First Name: Phoebe
AFC Fan Fiction Name: Heiki Koboi
Location: Forming the Ranga Revolution....MUHAHAHAHA!!!
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby opalkoboi » Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:07 pm

sharkie wrote:
Arty1995 wrote:Us english elitist (The majority of english-speaking people) will use intellectual english (Every day english) while you people can use your unorthadox and incoherent colloqiual english. Deep down inside we all know our english is more subtle.



That's a load of rubbish that the majority of english speaking people use your english. What you consider everyday english is NOT everyday english. Everyday english varies from place to place- everyday english in Newcastle is different from everyday english in New York which is different from every day english in Glasgow which is different from everyday english in Sydney.

English is a language spoken all over the world and has many different form, there is no such thing as a defined every day english- or correct English.


I like the point you made Sharkie, and just to add in my own weird way:
There is no "intelligent english" or "everyday english" - if anything, lol is everyday english for young people.
Secondly, everywhere in the world uses colloqiualisms. In Australlia, for example, they say Ranga instead of Ginger. Does that make it wrong? No! It's just a variation of the English language! If you notice, too, Arty 100% of the votes say it's a bad idea - so pay attention.
There is, however, standard english. English that is taught and used by the majority of english speakers. Besides, as long as we can understand each other, why does it matter?


I know, I hate the fact lol is replacing laughter! People say "lol" to a joke, and I'm just like, "Well why don't you?" XD
Image
I see you too! XD

Image

User avatar
Multiverse
Elf
Posts: 642
Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2011 8:21 pm
Location: Denmark
Gender: Male
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Multiverse » Wed Mar 30, 2011 7:39 pm

opalkoboi wrote:There is, however, standard english. English that is taught and used by the majority of english speakers. Besides, as long as we can understand each other, why does it matter?


Considering these two points (which I personally have to consider completely valid), it´s mildly interesting that there remains being a percentage of zero voters who doesn´t care.

I´ve personally always considered English, American and Australian three completely different languages. I guess they aren´t in this context, though. =P
This all puts me in mind of a quote: "We have really everything in common with America nowadays, except, of course, language." (by Oscar Wilde (who was, for the record, English))

-Multiverse
Image

User avatar
Arty1995
Centaur
Posts: 830
Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 12:48 pm
Location: UPSIDEDOWN LANDS!
Gender: Male
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Arty1995 » Thu Mar 31, 2011 7:23 am

I bet the British would beg to differ. I also bet they would say "No, no our English is the proper English. Your countries ruined it." since they were the first country to actually use it so they should be entitled to say what is and is not.

Why are you all calling me names? You are not here to judge me or my opinion, you are here to give your opinion and seek flaws in others opinions. I would like you both [Sharkie and Kitsy] to apologize for your rude and outlandish behaviour.
Image
Eternity Awards - Strangest member, 2010, 2011
Eternity Awards - Most Changed member, 2011
Eternity Awards - Looovers <3 [DATA EXPUNGED], Conquer the world! 2012

User avatar
Kitsy
Fufububbles
Fufububbles
Posts: 6887
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 7:57 pm
Real First Name: Katarina
Location: The land of Kitty (: aka. London
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Kitsy » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:49 am

You were being elitist and rude to people who use these terms, so no apology will be given. You weren't debating, you were being rude.

And by that logic: I am English, English is my first language and I think "lol" is a perfectly suitable word to be put in the dictionary.
Image
Silly little foul black twisted heart I am!
http://superkits.tumblr.com

User avatar
Arty1995
Centaur
Posts: 830
Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 12:48 pm
Location: UPSIDEDOWN LANDS!
Gender: Male
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Arty1995 » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:51 am

Kitsy wrote:You were being elitist and rude to people who use these terms, so no apology will be given. You weren't debating, you were being rude.

And by that logic: I am English, English is my first language and I think "lol" is a perfectly suitable word to be put in the dictionary.


Being an elitist is an honest thing to do. My rudeness comes from others being nieve to this act that will forever troll people who respect the english language.
Image
Eternity Awards - Strangest member, 2010, 2011
Eternity Awards - Most Changed member, 2011
Eternity Awards - Looovers <3 [DATA EXPUNGED], Conquer the world! 2012

User avatar
lethe_naiad
The Splendiferous
The Splendiferous
Posts: 2436
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 12:49 am
Real First Name: Lauren
Location: Back off, man. I'm a scientist.
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby lethe_naiad » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:57 am

You spelled naive wrong, O Protector of the English Language.
ImageImageImageImageImage

User avatar
sharkie
Crazy Cat Lady
Crazy Cat Lady
Posts: 4596
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2006 12:33 am
Location: Land of Tweed, Tartan, and Deep Fried Mars Bars
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby sharkie » Thu Mar 31, 2011 11:59 am

You do realise what attitudes like yours lead to. Here's a scottish person- I speak much more standard English... mostly because of oppression. In my parents generation and the generation before that, teachers were told to punish any children who spoke scots or glaswegian, etc, in the school. So children were taught that speaking any kind of language other than the queens english was common, rude, etc. This his amounted to losing a lot of the language.

What you're saying isn't that different. Yes we're talking 'LOL' and 'OMG', but this belief by some people that their English, and only their english, is correct, is damaging.

And no I don't consider any English better- it's just different. It's something I enjoy learning about. And Elitist is never used in a positive context Arty, it's class bigotry.
*TEETH KNASH* The yellow ducks shall eat your socks in the nighttime
Took Jangrafess out my sig, clearly he doesn't appreciate old respect when he's pulling stunts like that
Raped your sig to tell you, that yes it is! ~AG
Who cares. - Someone

I want to verb your noun

POKEMON BEASTIALITY PWNS ALL (yes, that was me - Jangra)

SORREH, Niki, teal is my color. ^_^ *rape* BOLD FTW. - Voldylicious
i thought you needed new rape from me and i like this color so *rapes* (:
oohhh kittyyy, she's so orgasmically amazing. *rapes*

User avatar
Kitsy
Fufububbles
Fufububbles
Posts: 6887
Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 7:57 pm
Real First Name: Katarina
Location: The land of Kitty (: aka. London
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Kitsy » Thu Mar 31, 2011 12:24 pm

lethe_naiad wrote:You spelled naive wrong, O Protector of the English Language.



If this was Facebook, I would like it.
Image
Silly little foul black twisted heart I am!
http://superkits.tumblr.com

User avatar
opalkoboi
Heiki Koboi
Posts: 1037
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 7:46 pm
Real First Name: Phoebe
AFC Fan Fiction Name: Heiki Koboi
Location: Forming the Ranga Revolution....MUHAHAHAHA!!!
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby opalkoboi » Thu Mar 31, 2011 7:53 pm

Arty1995 wrote:I bet the British would beg to differ. I also bet they would say "No, no our English is the proper English. Your countries ruined it." since they were the first country to actually use it so they should be entitled to say what is and is not.


I'm English, and I couldn't give a CRAP what was in the dictionary, so don't be a stereotyping bastard.

We are entitled to say what is and what's not. LOL and OMG are, problem solved you have no arguement. See how your point was flawed? We have to consider all English speaking countries. The English dictionary is in all these countries. So, to put "LOL" and "OMG" in, they would have to be used in the majority of these countries, if not all, and by many people. Language has developed. Here's a language developing rant:

Spoiler:
Languages change radically over the centuries. The main grammatical forerunner of English was called Anglo Saxon ans was primarily spoken in present day Sweden and parts of Denmark and northern Germany. The language was brought to Britain in the 5th and 6th century when the angles and Saxons conquered the land that became England. It contains all the grammatical constructs of English even though it is unintelligible to a modern speaker. It sounds like Old Swedish
------------
After the Normans invaded the island from the north part of present day France they brought their own language which was largely based on Latin. It combined with Old English to form what we call "Middle English". You can recognize a lot of the words even though the pronounciation and spelling is radically different.
----------
After middle English, you have "early modern English" which was spoken in various dialects all over the country of England. Of course the best known writer of this period is Shakespeare. By this point much of the vocabulary is the same as today, but the pacing, and pronunciation is still very different. At this point English started to be spread to Africa and Bermuda. In Shakespeare's very old age, English was starting to be spread to the USA.
----------
In the first hundred years of occupation of English speakers many people went into the Appalachian Mountains. There speech patterns developed very differently from Standard American English. In the 19th century it became popular to say that it was "Elizabethan English". Modern scholars dispute that interpretation. It is true that many words from Elizabethan English have been preserved in the mountain, but the language has evolved so much that it is incorrect to say it is Elizabethan English. This dialect has traditionally been seen as "ignorant". A lot of Appalachian English also has it's origins in the Scotch-Irish settlers. The English call them Ulster Scots.
--------------
In much the same way as Appalachian English evolved, the African American Vernacular English also evolved separately from Standard American English. It retains some of the older forms of English that have been lost to the standard. One of the most common is to say "acs" insteak of "ask". Five centuries ago that was part of standard English, but is now a very conspicuous part of AAVE. The most extreme version of AAVE is called Gullah, which is heavily mixed with African word pronunciation and is mostly spoken on the islands of South Carolina.

See, language has always changed and always will, until maybe one day the whole world speaks one language which contains bits of them all. Even if we all speak in acrynoms, who cares if we can understand each other?
Image
I see you too! XD

Image

User avatar
Exit
Tunnel Blue Spider
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2011 5:22 am
Gender: Male
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Exit » Fri Apr 01, 2011 2:58 am

No big deal. Dictionaries are meant to be documentation of vernacular, and English speakers use terms like these on a daily basis. Even if they go "out of style," though I highly doubt they will, it's keeping track of our history as well. Let's face it: our society is moving towards a very digital existence, and the language is evolving with it. So, we might as well start accepting commonly used internet phrases.

User avatar
Arty1995
Centaur
Posts: 830
Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 12:48 pm
Location: UPSIDEDOWN LANDS!
Gender: Male
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Arty1995 » Fri Apr 01, 2011 8:10 am

Adding 'lol' is useless. You are suppose to laugh, chuckle or giggle.

Saying 'omg' (oo-mg or oh-em-gee) is just downright weird.

I wish Facepunch would register here just to back me up. They would have a lot of fancy things to say. :(
Image
Eternity Awards - Strangest member, 2010, 2011
Eternity Awards - Most Changed member, 2011
Eternity Awards - Looovers <3 [DATA EXPUNGED], Conquer the world! 2012

User avatar
Sorcha
Commander
Posts: 1337
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 11:31 pm
Location: Your imagination
Gender: Female
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Sorcha » Fri Apr 01, 2011 1:31 pm

I guess 'hmm' and 'tsk' shouldn't be in the dictionary either because like a laugh, they're just sounds. Like Exit said, the dictionary is a documentation of vernacular. Internet phrases are used as part of every day language; it's common enough that it'd be included in the dictionary.
Image

raped by immortal and then sprinkled with love from kitty (:
you dare rape my sig?! o: i'ma gonna find out who did that. *kidnaps sig*

*raped with kisses and love from kitty again* ;)

User avatar
Arty1995
Centaur
Posts: 830
Joined: Tue Dec 01, 2009 12:48 pm
Location: UPSIDEDOWN LANDS!
Gender: Male
Status: Offline

Re: "OMG" and "LOL" enter The Oxford English Dictionary

Postby Arty1995 » Fri Apr 01, 2011 1:40 pm

8 people voted 'No.' How come I am the only one truely saying it's not good?
Image
Eternity Awards - Strangest member, 2010, 2011
Eternity Awards - Most Changed member, 2011
Eternity Awards - Looovers <3 [DATA EXPUNGED], Conquer the world! 2012


Return to “The Debate Forum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Artemis Fowl Confidential Fan Forum : Disclaimer
cron

Login  •  Register